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Underwater explosion

Underwater explosion

Some references:

Underwater explosion

Tsunami

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Shock wave focusing

Shock wave focusing

http://authors.library.caltech.edu/2069/01/CATpof97.pdf
Shock wave focusing using geometrical shock dynamics

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Instabilities in Material Behaviors

The linked two of my studies can be used as references for Zhigang’s lecture on Instabilities.

(1) Catastrophic fracture

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Surface roughness evolution

With a shallow chemical etching the roughness with spatial frequency below a critical value grows while the roughness of higher frequency decays.

node/1312

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POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES REINFORCED BY CARBON NANOTUBES

CONTINUUM MODELING OF INTERFACES IN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES REINFORCED BY CARBON NANOTUBES

L. Y. JIANG, H. TAN, J. WU, Y. HUANG, K. -C. HWANG
Review Article, 2007, accepted by NANO

The interface behavior may significantly influence the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced composites due to the large interface area per unit volume at the composite. The modeling of CNT/polymer interfaces has been a challenge in the continuum modeling of CNT reinforced composites.

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carbon nanotube-reinforced composite materials

The effect of van der Waals-based interface cohesive law on carbonnanotube-reinforced composite materials

H. Tan, L. Y. Jiang, Y. Huang, B. Liu, and K. C. Hwang
Composite Science and Technology, 2007, accepted.

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Sandwich structures

This blog is on the sandwich structures.

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read Physics of Fluids, 2007

This blog focuses on the papers in Physics of Fluids, 2007.

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Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2007

This blog focuses on the papers in Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2007.

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Experiment 11: Corrosion

Corrosion can be defined as the degradation of a material when it comes in contact with the environment. The dissolving of a material by a corrosive liquid is called chemical corrosion. The material continues to dissolve until either it is consumed or the liquid is saturated. A simple example is salt dissolving in water. The removing of metal atoms from a solid material as the result of an electric circuit is called electrochemical corrosion. In this form of corrosion, metal atoms lose electrons and become ions thus forming a byproduct. Electrochemical corrosion occurs most frequently in aqueous mediums, in which ions are present in water or moist air. In this process, an electric circuit is created and the system is called an electrochemical cell. Corrosion of a steel pipe or a steel automobile panel, creating holes in the steel and rust as the byproduct, are examples of this reaction.

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Homework: Ceramics

Homework: Ceramics

Return back to Materials of Engineering Laboratory (node/1061)

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Experiment 10: Ceramics

The primary drawback of using ceramic materials in structural applications is their inherent brittleness which results from strong bonding coupled with electrical balancing restrictions due to the metallic plus non-metallic nature of ceramic compounds. The Modulus of Rupture (MOR) test is the standard for determining the mechanical properties of ceramics (Flexural Strength and Flexural Modulus).

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Quiz: Metallography Specimen Preparation and Examination

Quiz: Metallography Specimen Preparation and Examination

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Experiment 9: Metallography Specimen Preparation and Examination

Proper preparation of metallographic specimens to determine microstructure and content requires that a rigid step-by-step process be followed. In sequence, the steps include sectioning, mounting, course grinding, fine grinding, polishing, etching, and microscopic examination. Specimens must be kept clean and preparation procedure carefully followed in order to reveal accurate microstructures. Each student will prepare and examine a brass, steel or aluminium sample for metallographic examination. Additionally, a brass, steel or aluminum sample with different composition, a eutectoid steel sample and a eutectoid Pb-Sn sample will be examined under the metallographic microscope. Photographs will be taken of the samples and the ASTM grain size number determined for each of the specimens if applicable.

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Quiz: Polymers and Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

Quiz: Polymers and Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

Return back to Materials of Engineering Laboratory (node/1061)

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Experiment 8: Composite Materials

Composites consist of two or more phases that are usually processed separately and then bonded, resulting in properties that are different from those of either of the component materials.

Polymer matrix composites generally combine high-strength, high-stiffness fibers (graphite, kevlar, etc.) with low-density matrix materials (epoxy, polyvinyl, etc.) to produce strong & stiff materials that are lightweight.

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Experiment 7: Polymers

The mechanical properties of polymers vary significantly from polymer to polymer as a result of atomic structure and bond strength. Thermoplastic polymers are generally composed of long coiling carbon chains that are primary bonded along the chains, but are secondarily bonded between chains. Thermoplastics tend to either contain crosslinks (primary bonds between chains) or are composed of three-dimensional space networks, but thermosets tend to be comparatively expensive and can’t be recycled. The tensile properties of representative samples from the three primary polymer types (thermoplastics, thermosets and elastomers) will be tested and evaluated. When a polymer is subjected to a constant strain yet realizes a decrease in stress as a function of time, it is said to be undergoing Stress Relaxation. Two experiments will be conducted on polymeric samples to investigate their stress relaxation behavior. The quantifying parameter, Relaxation Time Constant, will be determined for the two samples tested.

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Quiz: Fatigue Testing

Quiz: Fatigue Testing

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Experiment 6: Fatigue Testing

A perusal of the broken parts in almost any scrap yard will reveal that the majority of failures occur at stresses below the yield strength. This is a result of the phenomenon called fatigue which has been estimated to be responsible for up to 90% of the in-service part failures which occur in industry. If a bar of steel is repeatedly loaded and unloaded at say 85% of its’ yield strength, it will ultimately fail in fatigue if it is loaded through enough cycles.

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